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Any serious Internet marketing strategy should include social media as critical to its success. While having a website is the bare minimum, it’s unlikely to get much traction without social media. Just like any other marketing technique, however, there are several choices of platforms and methodologies to consider.

First, you need to know who your audience is (or who your audiences are). Where do they prefer to hang out online? Each platform has a mixture of users, and your business may also have a mixture of audiences. But without this information, you may wind up focusing on the wrong platforms, missing out on others that would be better for your business.

Research whether or not your audience uses a platform to take action or just to find information. And decide if this aligns with your company’s goals. While many users may be on one platform, they may be just hanging out for entertainment purposes. You may have to spend more money to place ads or maintain a presence there than with another.

This article just touches on some of the major social media platforms for marketing, but it’s only a start. If your budget allows in-depth marketing trials and analyses, thoroughly investigate each one. If not, try a few that make the most sense. Just start somewhere.

Facebook

Facebook is a household name, and most major companies have a presence. Businesses can put up a simple page or launch full on campaigns. Surveys, polls, daily (or even hourly) postings, conversations with readers, and even Facebook apps are all examples of ways to enhance a Facebook presence. Even though there should be a link to your company’s website, some companies use Facebook as a makeshift website.

Twitter

Millions of readers use Twitter to find out about news as it happens. Having a Twitter account lets companies interact almost immediately with their customers and prospects. From writing witty content during major events to using hashtags for people to follow, Twitter is a major player in marketing businesses. Like Facebook, written content is the main way it connects with readers, though images and video are quickly gaining favor.

Instagram

Instagram’s platform uses primarily images/photos and videos to communicate messages to its users. This works really well with a company whose products are interesting, or those who have a message that is enhanced with the spoken word. It’s growing in popularity, and it is often shared to other platforms.

LinkedIn

What’s notable about LinkedIn is that many of its users don’t use Facebook or Twitter. LinkedIn caters to businesses, so if your company is B2B, this is the platform for you. Like the others, it can be connected to other platforms, but don’t overlook its power as a marketing and networking tool. And LinkedIn is always testing new ways to build its brand and increase its value.

Blogs

The last platform we’ll cover here is blogs. Blogs are just websites that post new content on regular basis – sort of like an online newsletter or magazine. Businesses can teach readers about their field, give them tips, entertain them, or even converse with them in the comments section. Other bloggers share blog articles, search engines rank them just like any other website, and they are a great resource for keeping customers coming back for more. Regular websites tend to be more static and out-of-sight/mind.

Finally, though there are other platforms to consider, this is a good list to get started. As other social media platforms gain in popularity and influence, research their pros and cons. Give them a trial run when time and money permit. Most of all, good luck in the world of Internet marketing. It’s truly a web – easy to lose your way but not hard to find a connection.

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Internet marketing means telling the world you’re in business. It’s the equivalent of putting a huge sign on your brick and mortar store, placing ads in local newspapers, and activating rotating spotlights in the sky. Getting new customers is tough if they don’t even know your company exists.

The bare minimum of Internet marketing is having a web presence. Search engines list websites if the user types in just the right combination of terms. But your company’s site may nearly impossible to find otherwise.

If you want to increase your audience (which can translate into increased sales), you can use a variety of marketing techniques, but there’s so much you can do while still focusing on just the website.

Keep Your Website Relevant

When was the last time your online presence was updated? The content and the design should get tweaks from time to time. If it has flashy images or popups, make sure they’re comparable to other websites’ techniques. Change the copyright at the bottom to reflect the current year. Research your competition and keep up with the latest technology. The online world changes so quickly.

Mobile-ize

Websites users aren’t stuck at their desktops anymore. In fact, according to comScore, mobile has overtaken desktops in media and website use. Is your website optimized for mobile viewing? Do you know how it looks on a tablet or smartphone? Does your site load easily if the device isn’t connected to Wi-Fi? Are the icons easy for fingers to tap? Does it navigate intuitively? How does it look in different browsers and with different operating systems on mobile devices?

SEO Best Practices

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the practice of making a website rank higher in search engines. When someone enters search terms into their favorite browser, the hope is that your site shows up on the first page. Sure, this can be a lofty goal when there are millions of websites out there, but that’s the whole point of SEO. Understand what your prospective customers are looking for, and hopefully your SEO expert can help your site rank higher for those terms. As with the rest of the Internet, SEO is constantly changing. Do your best to keep up.

Analyze Constantly

Do a baseline analysis of your company’s website using analytics tools (e.g., Google Analytics). Then set some benchmarks and re-analyze the initial markers. Has website traffic changed? Are visitors coming back repeatedly? What pages are popular?

Analysis can also come in the form of surveys or other direct feedback methods. Numbers only tell so much of the story. Pay attention to reviews, ask your visitors what they think of your website, or even test things out using your employees as reviewers.

Improving your Internet marketing doesn’t have to be mind-boggling. While you can employ a variety of strategies, concentrating on your website alone is a sound way to make progress. Keep informed and keep up with the times.

guy-on-pcIt’s no secret that marketing your business online is essential, so pretty much every company already has online real estate in place. But with the non-stop, seemingly overnight Internet changes, it’s no easy task deciding what strategies to implement – and when.

So where do you start? Should you research a dozen Internet marketing articles for the newest techniques? Look at what your competitors are doing? Stand frozen like a deer in headlights?

Before getting overwhelmed with the possibilities, the first step is to analyze what you’re already doing. If your company has a website and a blog in place, it’s time to stand back and take a super close look at how those things are working for you. Let’s cover a few of the most important data points to gather before you do anything drastic.

Is Anyone Visiting Your Site?

Using website analytics tools (e.g., Google Analytics, Mint, and GoSquared), find out how many people are visiting your site. Daily and monthly visits are the most important to note. Internet marketing goals usually include increasing visitors, so you need to know where you are right now.

Who’s Visiting and Are They Coming Back?

Obviously, this is closely related to the first data point. Just because you have 1000 visitors each day doesn’t mean they’re relevant. If 900 of the visits are from the same person, your message isn’t getting out there. If you are getting a lot of new visitors, it may not mean very much if they take one look at your site and never come back. Your website’s goal is to get a variety of people who find enough value in your website to stop by and want to come back to learn even more.

How Was Their Visit?

New people who keep coming back is great, but what did they do there? Did they spend time on various pages (page views and pages per session), take one look at the site and click away (bounce rate), or stay a long time (average session duration)?

Where Did They Come From?

Finally, how did your company find your online property? Some may have found you directly by typing in your URL. Others may have clicked on a search engine suggestion (organic), clicked on a link in an article (referral), or even been led there by a social media post (social). Knowing your traffic’s source(s) can help you decide what highways you want to focus on for future campaigns.

This list isn’t exhaustive – you can definitely find out more about your website using other data points. But don’t get bogged down with this first step either. Once you’ve done some of this background work, start deciding what your website goals are. Armed with this information, researching strategies won’t seem so overwhelming.

16 Must Know Stats About Online Fundraising and Social Media Square
It’s true that social media is in transition. Facebook Reach is at an all time low. Instagram has a new algorithm. Twitter is in flux. And the next Big Thing in social media 💯 Snapchat 😍 is baffling to many seasoned social media managers. But digital and mobile app payments are coming. The global internet population is set to triple in the next four years. The Internet of Things will transform our world. And email ROI and online giving is up, up, up! In reality, the peak years of email, online fundraising, and social media are ahead of us and the next decade will astound us all.

1. Nearly one in three (31.5%) people worldwide donated to charity in 2015 and one in four (24%) volunteered.

PIR-Illustrations

Source: CAF World Giving Index 2015

2. By 2018, the global population of social media users is projected to grow to 2.44 billion, or 33% of the world population.

global social media audience

Source: TrackMaven

3. Total giving is expected to grow 4.1% in 2016 and 4.3% in 2017. The vast majority of the giving will be done by individuals.

total giving growth

Source: The Philanthropy Outlook

4. Matures donate $683 annually. Boomers $478. Gen Xers $465. And Millennials $238.

how much different generations give to charity

Source: Abila

5. Donors 40-59 years old are now the most likely to give online.

Donors40-59NowMostLikelyToGiveOnline_Dunham_2016_website

Source: Dunham+Company

6. Millennials most inspired to give by social media. Gen X and Baby Boomers by email.Prediction: Gen Z will prefer mobile apps.

2016 Global Giving Trends SMALL

Source: Global NGO Online Technology Report

7. 95% of NGOs worldwide have a Facebook Page. 83% have a Twitter Profile. 40% are active on Instagram.

Social Media Used By NGOs Worldwide SMALL

Source: Global NGO Online Technology Report

8. Internet users have an average of 5.5 social media accounts. They are regularly active on 2.8 of those accounts.

number of accounts worldwide

Source: Global Web Index

9. 18% of all online donations come from mobile device users.

mobile giving stats

Source: CDW

10. On average, your followers should grow 23% annually on both Facebook and Twitter.

global social media growth

Source: TrackMaven

11. Short videos, short online articles, and short emails keep donors the most engaged, informed, and inspired to give.

inspired giving engagement

Source: Abila

12. For every 1,000 fundraising emails delivered, a nonprofit raises $44.

Email Revenue

Source: M+R Benchmarks Study

13. For Every 1,000 email subscribers, nonprofits have 355 Facebook follower, 132 Twitter followers, and 19 Instagram followers.

For every 1,000 email subscribers

Source: M+R Benchmarks Study

14. 11% of all online giving occurs over the last three days of the year.

December Giving

Source: Network for Good

15. Given the opportunity, 48% of American adults would make donations within a mobile app.

Cone Communications Mobile App

Source: Cone Communications

16. 42% of nonprofits use WordPress as the Content Management System for their website.

wordpress nonprofits 2

Source: npENGAGE

Article Source: http://www.nptechforgood.com/2016/05/13/16-must-know-stats-about-online-fundraising-and-social-media/